Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Readings for Logical Analysis (Second Edition) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Readings for Logical Analysis (Second Edition) book. Happy reading Readings for Logical Analysis (Second Edition) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Readings for Logical Analysis (Second Edition) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Readings for Logical Analysis (Second Edition) Pocket Guide.

Ships with Tracking Number!

Top Authors

May not contain Access Codes or Supplements. May be ex-library. Buy with confidence, excellent customer service!.

Brand New!. Seller Inventory VIB Seller Inventory n. Item added to your basket View basket. Proceed to Basket. View basket. Continue shopping. Title: readings logical analysis. The book is consistent in terminology, formatting, and examples. It flows well from one topic to the next, but it is also possible to jump around the text without loosing the voice of the text. The books is broken down into sub units that make it easy to assign short blocks of content at a time.

Later in the text, it does refer to a few concepts that appear early in that text, but these are all basic concepts that must be used to create a clear and understandable text. No sections are too long and each section stays on topic and relates the topic to those that have come before when necessary.

The flow of the text is logical and clear. It begins with the basic building blocks of arguments, and practice identifying more and more complex arguments is offered. Each chapter builds up from the previous chapter in introducing propositional logic, truth tables, and logical arguments. A select number of fallacies are presented at the end of the text, but these are related to topics that were presented before, so it makes sense to have these last. The text is free if interface issues.


  • 2. Game Structure and Game Logics;
  • The Persians.
  • It Just Works.
  • Gustav Landauer: Anarchist and Jew!
  • Let Them Eat Cake! (Mr. Peabody & Sherman);

I used the PDF and it worked fine on various devices without loosing formatting. The text is culturally sensitive, but examples used are a bit odd and may be objectionable to some students. For instance, President Obama's speech on Syria is used to evaluate an extended argument.

This is an excellent example and it is explained well, but some who disagree with Obama's policies may have trouble moving beyond their own politics. However, other examples look at issues from all political viewpoints and ask students to evaluate the argument, fallacy, etc. Overall this book does use a variety of examples that most students can understand and evaluate. My favorite part of this book is that it seems to be written for community college students.

My students have trouble understanding readings in the New York Times, so it is nice to see a logic and critical thinking text use real language that students can understand and follow without the constant need of a dictionary. This textbook covers enough topics for a first-year course on logic and critical thinking. Chapter 1 covers the basics as in any standard textbook in this area. Chapter 2 covers propositional logic and categorical logic.

Society for the Study of the History of Analytical Philosophy

In propositional logic, In propositional logic, this textbook does not cover suppositional arguments, such as conditional proof and reductio ad absurdum. But other standard argument forms are covered. Chapter 3 covers inductive logic, and here this textbook introduces probability and its relationship with cognitive biases, which are rarely discussed in other textbooks. Chapter 4 introduces common informal fallacies. The answers to all the exercises are given at the end.

However, the last set of exercises is in Chapter 3, Section 5. There are no exercises in the rest of the chapter. Chapter 4 has no exercises either. There is index, but no glossary. The textbook is fairly modular. For example, Chapter 3, together with a few sections from Chapter 1, can be used as a short introduction to inductive logic. This textbook is quite thorough--there are conversational explanations of argument structure and logic. I think students will be happy with the conversational style this author employs.

Also, there are many examples and exercises using current Also, there are many examples and exercises using current events, funny scenarios, or other interesting ways to evaluate argument structure and validity. The third section, which deals with logical fallacies, is very clear and comprehensive.

My only critique of the material included in the book is that the middle section may be a bit dense and math-oriented for learners who appreciate the more informal, informative style of the first and third section. Also, the book ends rather abruptly--it moves from a description of a logical fallacy to the answers for the exercises earlier in the text. The content is very reader-friendly, and the author writes with authority and clarity throughout the text.

There are a few surface-level typos Starbuck's instead of Starbucks, etc. None of these small errors detract from the quality of the content, though. One thing I really liked about this text was the author's wide variety of examples. To demonstrate different facets of logic, he used examples from current media, movies, literature, and many other concepts that students would recognize from their daily lives. The exercises in this text also included these types of pop-culture references, and I think students will enjoy the familiarity--as well as being able to see the logical structures behind these types of references.

I don't think the text will need to be updated to reflect new instances and occurrences; the author did a fine job at picking examples that are relatively timeless.

Readings for Logical Analysis by Stephen R.C. Hicks

As far as the subject matter itself, I don't think it will become obsolete any time soon. The author writes in a very conversational, easy-to-read manner. The examples used are quite helpful. The third section on logical fallacies is quite easy to read, follow, and understand. A student in an argument writing class could benefit from this section of the book. The middle section is less clear, though. A student learning about the basics of logic might have a hard time digesting all of the information contained in chapter two. This material might be better in two separate chapters.

I think the author loses the balance of a conversational, helpful tone and focuses too heavily on equations.

Session 2: Scientific Diaspora

Terminology in this book is quite consistent--the key words are highlighted in bold. Chapters 1 and 3 follow a similar organizational pattern, but chapter 2 is where the material becomes more dense and equation-heavy. I also would have liked a closing passage--something to indicate to the reader that we've reached the end of the chapter as well as the book. I liked the overall structure of this book.

If I'm teaching an argumentative writing class, I could easily point the students to the chapters where they can identify and practice identifying fallacies, for instance. The opening chapter is clear in defining the necessary terms, and it gives the students an understanding of the toolbox available to them in assessing and evaluating arguments. Even though I found the middle section to be dense, smaller portions could be assigned.